THE ADVANTAGES OF THE SCLERAL LENS FOR DRY EYE AND KERATOCONUS

Blog-4._Scleral-Lens-and-KeratoconusIn previous blogs we learned that dry eyes is a problem that affects many people. We also learned that a course of products can be used to relieve dry eyes. Lastly, the Blephex machine can easily get rid of the bacteria which produces exotoxins that stop the formation of healthy tears which ultimately cause dry eye.

In this final blog of our dry eye series we will focus on the Scleral Lens, which is very beneficial in combatting severe dry eye. This lens is larger and more rigid compared to the conventional contact lens. Its unique formation covers the entire cornea which prevent it from moving out of place when the wearer blinks. One of the most significant benefits of this specialized lens is its ability to combat dry eye. This is due to its unique shape, which creates extra space between the back of the contact lens and the cornea. This space which acts as a reservoir for saline solution is extremely important in preventing dry eye.

Another important benefit of the Scleral Lens is that it is helpful in treating people with a progressive eye disease called Keratoconus. Although this condition occurs mostly with young adults, it has been found in people of all ages. Keratoconus affects one or both eyes by thinning and weakening the cornea. This thinning makes it flimsy and creates a bulge or a cone shape. This irregular formation causes nearsightedness and irregular astigmatism to develop, and eventually without treatment, distorted blurred vision and glare and light sensitivity will occur. The unique shape of the Scleral lens accommodates the sufferers of Keratoconus by providing a uniform surface like that of a healthy normal cornea. Keratoconus is hereditary, so if a family member has it, you are advised to have your eyes checked out as soon as possible.

Scleral Lens technology is advancing rapidly and manufacturers are designing them to correct more vision problems than ever before. Our doctors at our Finch and St. Clair offices will be more than happy to explain the benefits of these lenses. Come in and inquire about the Scleral lens the next time you’re here for a visit.

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North York Eye Clinic / Toronto /

Dr. Greg D’Orio is the patriarch of his family, working alongside his son Steven in their family trade. The elder D’Orio graduated from the University of Waterloo optometry program in 1980 and is in an organization raising money to fight cancer. He is also an Eucharistic minister at St. David’s Catholic Church and a member of the Knights of Columbus. He has volunteered in the Special Olympics, in addition to his regular visits to elderly patients in nursing homes and house calls. Over the years, Dr. D’Orio has established a practice that adheres to his dreams and goals; which is to fulfill his goal of helping and caring for people with eye related issues. Alongside his son, he hopes to continue helping those in need.

WHAT’S LIVING ON YOUR CONTACT LENSES?

We’re constantly surrounded by microbes that can eat our eyeballs, but that doesn’t usually happen unless you wear contact lenses.

Contacts are awesome, but anyone who’s worn them, knows that they can cause problems, like redness and eye pain. But the most serious problem is something called “Microbial Keratitis,” which is an infection of the cornea. The cornea is the clear layer that is considered the transparent window of the eyeball.  And if it gets infected it can sometimes lead to blindness. Lots of different germs can cause keratitis: bacteria, fungi, viruses like herpes, and even amoeba. The interesting thing is that the species of fungi, amoeba, and bacteria that cause the disease are actually found all over the place. Literally. For example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is the most common keratitis-causing bacteria, is actually found in tap water and on the lettuce in your fridge! But if these bugs are so prevalent, why aren’t we constantly getting infections?

Great question. Well, because our eyes are really important for our survival, we’ve developed lightning quick defenses to kill most germs that land there. In fact, these defenses are so good that by studying the eye, scientists are starting to learn some secrets for keeping other parts of our body pathogen-free. The problem is that these super prevalent microbes are super prevalent because they’re awesome at adapting to new situations.

So when you trap them against your eye with a contact lens for hours on end, you could essentially be selecting for bugs that can survive this really harsh environment. The few that make it actually like it there and keep on replicating. To make matters worse, when you remove your lenses and leave them to soak, you may be selecting for bugs that can survive antimicrobial solutions, as well! Eventually, these superbugs might start eating their way through your cornea.

If you feel any discomfort in your eye, like if it feels like there’s something stuck in there even after you take out your lenses and that feeling just seems to get worse, keep those lenses out of your eyes and let your doctor know. If you wait too long, your body’s inflammatory response can kick in, which can cause its own damage. In fact, it’s sometimes the inflammation, and not the amoeba or bacteria, that finally causes blindness.

Keratitis only affects about 0.2% of people who wear contact lenses on an extended basis. But for those who get it, it can be extremely serious, so scientists are studying how to prevent it altogether. But in the meantime, if you’re a contact lens wearer, what can you do to prevent keratitis?

Well, it’s not foolproof, but wearing the type of lenses you throw out at the end of each day could help. And of course follow your doctor’s instructions.

WHAT_S LIVING ON YOUR CONTACT LENSES_

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE LEADS TO EYE DISEASE

Have you noticed that whenever you go into the doctor’s office for any reason, they always check your blood pressure? They put the sphygmomanometer or blood pressure metre around your arm and inflate it with air. This is such a standard procedure but a very critical one in the maintenance of our health. Although the human body is extremely complex, with many different ‘moving parts’, all the unique and different parts are all interconnected. So, a pulled muscle in your hamstring can affect your neck’s mobility as with a condition like high blood pressure can affect the way your eyes process images. Everything is connected, and nothing can be left to chance, especially when it concerns our health!

Did you know that blood pressure is the force of pressure against the blood vessel walls, and not the speed at which blood flows through your arteries and veins? Did you also know that high blood pressure leads to Hypertensive retinopathy, an eye disease that has no symptoms but is easily detected during a routine eye exam? It’s a scary thought when something as serious as high blood pressure which causes life threatening conditions like aneurysms (bulging of your artery), heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure, have no symptoms.

The causes of high blood pressure are still unknown, but known factors do contribute to its development:

– Smoking

– Being overweight

– Consuming too much salt

– Being physically inactive

– Consumption of too much alcohol

– Stress

– Older age

– Genetics

– Adrenal and thyroid disorders

– Sleep apnea

It seems like anyone can have high blood pressure. You don’t need to be overweight, nor do you have to consume unhealthy amounts of salt or even be a smoker. You can be fit and have problems sleeping. You can be at an age where the chances of having high blood pressure are more common. Your high blood pressure could be hereditary. Or you could just be under a lot of stress.

high-blood-pressure-and-vision---Copy (1)

Did you also know that your optometrists  can check for high blood pressure? They’ll use a special instrument called an ophthalmoscope to check the back of your eyeball for narrowed blood vessels, spotting of the retina, any type of discharge, swelling of the retina and optic nerve and any kind of bleeding.

We are all at risk, regardless of our health, which is why we should come in and have ourselves checked out. See your health care provider or your eye doctor before its too late. Do it today!

THIS PROCEDURE IS WORTH LOOKING INTO

The Blephex machine is a medical device that is used by ophthalmologists to treat Blepharitis, the most common eye disease in the world. And until recently, it is the most undertreated eye disease in the world. It is also a precursor to Dry Eye Disease (DED). Some of the visual symptoms of Blepharitis are the swelling, grittiness and crusting of the eyes. This crusting can lead to the very terrifying issue of the sufferer’s eyes being stuck together in the morning. The irritating effects of itching and foreign body sensation accompany this unsightly appearance, along with the constant need to rub them. As the disease progresses, it will eventually lead to DED.

These symptoms are the result of the over production of otherwise normally occurring bacteria that live along the margins of the eyelid and eyelash area. This overgrowth of bacteria spawns a biofilm that is the perfect environment for the Demodex mite, which produces exotoxins that damage tear glands and prevent them from actively creating healthy tears – which help to maintain the health of the eyelid and eyelash area.

The process of cleaning with the Blephex machine is painless and quite simple – the ophthalmologists glides the clinical grade sponge along the eye lid and lash line. This procedure removes the biofilm which the DemodexMite use as a food source. This brief procedure brings immediate relief and the production of healthy tears is initiated.

The beneficial effects of cleaning your eyelid and eyelash area are much like visiting your dentist to maintain healthy teeth. By having your eyelids cleaned regularly, this ensures that Blepharitis will be stopped from returning and that your tear glands will actively continue to make healthy tears, thus avoiding Dry Eye Disease.

Our location at St. Clair is fully equipped to check for Dry Eye Disease. Contact us before this becomes a problem that could have been prevented.

High blood pressure leads to eye disease called Hypertensive retinopathy

Have you noticed that whenever you go into the doctor’s office for any reason, they always check your blood pressure? They put the sphygmomanometer or blood pressure metre around your arm and inflate it with air. This is such a standard procedure but a very critical one in the maintenance of our health. Although the human body is extremely complex, with many different ‘moving parts’, all the unique and different parts are all interconnected. So, a pulled muscle in your hamstring can affect your neck’s mobility as with a condition like high blood pressure can affect the way your eyes process images. Everything is connected, and nothing can be left to chance, especially when it concerns our health!

high-blood-pressure-and-vision---Copy

Did you know that blood pressure is the force of pressure against the blood vessel walls, and not the speed at which blood flows through your arteries and veins? Did you also know that high blood pressure leads to Hypertensive retinopathy, an eye disease that has no symptoms but is easily detected during a routine eye exam? It’s a scary thought when something as serious as high blood pressure which causes life threatening conditions like aneurysms (bulging of your artery), heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure, have no symptoms.

 

The causes of high blood pressure are still unknown, but known factors do contribute to its development:

  • Smoking
  • Being overweight
  • Consuming too much salt
  • Being physically inactive
  • Consumption of too much alcohol
  • Stress
  • Older age
  • Genetics
  • Adrenal and thyroid disorders
  • Sleep apnea

It seems like anyone can have high blood pressure. You don’t need to be overweight, nor do you have to consume unhealthy amounts of salt or even be a smoker. You can be fit and have problems sleeping. You can be at an age where the chances of having high blood pressure are more common. Your high blood pressure could be hereditary. Or you could just be under a lot of stress.

Did you also know that your optometrists can check for high blood pressure? They’ll use a special instrument called an ophthalmoscope to check the back of your eyeball for narrowed blood vessels, spotting of the retina, any type of discharge, swelling of the retina and optic nerve and any kind of bleeding.

We are all at risk, regardless of our health, which is why we should come in and have ourselves checked out. See your health care provider or your eye doctor before its too late. Do it today! Contact us today!